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Ferruccio Laviani

Ferruccio Laviani was born in Cremona in 1960. In 1986 he graduated in architecture at the polytechnic institute in Milan . He also participated in the "12 nuovi memphis " and Memphis 87 collections and was one of the founders of the Solid group and designed part of the collection.

From 1986-1991 he was a member of the De Lucchi studio, designing for various companies such as Credito Bergamasco, Mandarina Duck, Memphis, Olivetti and Swatch. In 1991 he put on show the silverware from the Morandotti collection at the "Capitali Europee del nuovo design" (European capitals of new design) exhibition at the Centre Pompidou in Paris . 1992 He designed for Foscarini, Emmemobili, T70, Halifax, Mixel, Fontana Arte, De Padova, Flos and Molteni & C.

From 1995-1997 he implemented the photographic show relating to the book entitled "Welcome to Brazil" for the Forum Confeccoes and the "24 hours" catalogue (Sao Paulo gallery). From 1997 until today he continues to collaborate with cosmit having fit out cultural exhibitions dedicated to Gio Ponti and Vico Magistretti.

Poul Henningsen

Poul Henningsen

Poul Henningsen was born in Copenhagen to the famous Danish actress Agnes Henningsen. He never graduated as an architect, but studied at The Technical School at Frederiksberg , Denmark from 1911-14, and then at Technical College in Copenhagen from 1914-17.

He started practicing traditional functionalistic architecture, but over the years his professional interests changed to focus mainly on lighting. He also expanded his field of occupation into areas of writing, becoming a journalist and an author. For a short period at the beginning of WWII, he was the head architect of the Tivoli Gardens in Copenhagen . But like many other creative people, he was forced to flee Denmark during the German occupation but soon became a vital part of the Danish colony of artists living in Sweden .

His lifelong collaboration with Louis Poulsen Lighting began in 1925 and lasted until his death. To this day, Louis Poulsen Lighting still benefits from his genius. Poul Henningsen was also the first editor of the company magazine "NYT". The CEO of Louis Poulsen at the time, Sophus Kaastrup-Olsen, gave the magazine to PH as a gift because he had been terminated from the Danish newspaper he worked for (his opinions were too radical).

Poul Henningsen's pioneering work concerning the relations between light structures, shadows, glare, and color reproduction ompared to man's need for light remains the foundation of the lighting theories still practiced by Louis Poulsen Lighting.

Verner Panton

Verner Panton was an inspirational and colorful personality. A unique person with a special sense of colours, shapes, light function and room.

Over the course of his career Verner Panton (1926-1998) introduced a series of modern lamps with personalities unlike any of his Scandinavian contemporaries.

With a remarkable faith in the unlimited possibilities of the form, he worked successfully to create a new set of theories about how lighting should work and how it should influence its surroundings.

Verner Panton in his own words:
"The main purpose of my work is to provoke people into using their imagination. Most people spend their lives living in dreary, grey-beige conformity, mortally afraid of usning colors. By experimenting with lighting, colors, textiles and furniture and utilizing the latest technologies, I try to show new ways, to encourage people to use their fantasy imagination and make their surroundings more exciting"

Philippe Starck

Philippe Starck

Born in Paris in 1949, he is one of the most original and creative designers of our time. He has obtained many important acknowledgements such as the Grand Prix National de la Crtion industrielle and the Honor Award of the American Institute of Architects, he considers himself as "a Japanese architect, an American art director, a German industrial designer, a French artistic director, an Italian furniture designer".

Achille Castiglioni

Achille Castiglioni 

Born in Milan (1918-2002), he started work as an architect and designer with his brothers Livio and Pier Giacomo in 1938. One of the great masters of Italian design, he was a founding member of ADI in the fifties. The long list of awards he has received include eight Compassi d'Oro. His activity as a designer is an unmistakable blend of simplicity, irony and fun and its shows his close interest in the way objects are used, in the potential offered by technology and in the use of new materials.

Christophe Pillet

Christophe Pillet

Graduated from the Decorative Arts School in Nice in 1985, Master in Domus Academy, Milano, in 1986. His first pieces of furniture were produced by XO in 1991. He has been working independently since 1993. Christophe Pillet works in product and furniture design, interior decoration, architecture, scemography and artistic direction.

Arne Jacobsen

Arne Jacobsen

Arne Jacobsen (1902-1971) was trained as a bricklayer and graduated from The Technical Society's school in 1924 and Copenhagen Art Academy 1927. In 1928 he received the Academy's gold medal, but prior to this, when only 23, he was awarded a silver medal at the 1925 Paris World Exhibition — the first of numerous honours that became a natural accompaniment to his artistic activities, his untiring search and his brilliant conceptions, made manifest by many successes in competitions at home and abroad.

Studio Job

Studio Job

Job Smeets was born in1970 in Belgium and studied at the Design Academy Eindhoven from '90 to '95. He established his own studio Job in 1998.

Nynke Tynagel was born in 1977 in the Netherlands and joined Job after graduating from the Design Academy Eindhoven in 2000.

"Our design is about freedom. We think that design is a universal language spoken with shapes instead of words. In our design the important interaction is between onlooker and object. By looking at our objects, the onlooker looks directly into our eyes. In this sense our work is like a diary. Very intuitive and direct, we try to translate our experiences and ideas into an object or a collection."

Maruo Marzollo

Maruo Marzollo

After finishing secondary art school and an industrial design course at University, Mauro Marzollo began his career in Murano where would learn various techniques of the regional master glassblowers. With these skills and experience he continued his career at Lumenform, where he lead their design department, working with famous artists and design celebrities.

Mauro Marzollo continued to expand his passion, moving into a private practice. In this private enterprise, he begaikn hsi collaboration with I Tre, who charged him with leading their research and development department, creating new technical and formal design products. It is here that he began designing for Murano Due, Aureliano Toso 1938 and Alt Lucialternative. Mauro Marzollo continues to lead his own professional practice, designing innovative lighting and furnishings.

Alberto Meda

Alberto Meda

Born in Lenno Tremezzina in the province of Como in 1945, he graduated in mechanical engineering at the Milan Polytechnic in 1969. After being the technical director of Kartell in the seventies, he dedicated himself to design, applying his experience in polyurethane resins and new materials in general. In this period he won two Compasso d'Oro awards.

Jasper Morrison

Jasper Morrison

Jasper Morrison is one of today's most influential industrial designers. Born in London, he is renowned for his elegant and straightforward style. With Jasper Morrison Ltd, he has desigend for Alessi and Flos.


George Nelson

George Nelson

When writing about the course of his remarkable 50-year career, George Nelson described a series of creative "zaps"--moments of out-of-the-blue inspiration "when the solitary individual finds he is connected with a reality he never dreamed of."

An early zap came in the 1930s, when he was an architectural student in Rome. Before returning home, an idea struck him: He would travel Europe and interview leading modern architects, hoping to get the articles published in the U.S. He succeeded, and in the process introduced the U.S. design community to the European avant-garde. This set in motion a sequence of what he called "lucky" career breaks that were really the inevitable outcomes of his brilliance as a designer, teacher, and author.

The first break was being named an editor of Architectural Forum magazine. Working on a story there in 1942, he was looking at aerial photos of blighted cities when--zap!--he developed the concept of the downtown pedestrian mall, which was unveiled in the Saturday Evening Post.

Soon after, another zap led to the Storagewall, the first modular storage system and a forerunner of systems furniture. The Storagewall was showcased in a 1945 Life magazine article, causing a sensation in the furniture industry. Herman Miller founder D.J. DePree saw the article and was so impressed that he paid a visit to Nelson in New York and convinced him to be his director of design, which spurred Nelson to found his design firm, George Nelson & Associates. The warm personal and professional relationship between Nelson and DePree yielded a stunning range of products, from the playful Marshmallow Sofa to the first L-shaped desk, a precursor of today's workstation.

Nelson once wrote that Herman Miller "is not playing follow-the-leader." That's one reason why George Nelson & Associates worked with Herman Miller for over 25 years as they shepherded design into the modern era.

During this same period, George Nelson & Associates also created many landmark designs of products, showrooms, and exhibitions for a variety of companies and organizations.

Nelson said that for a designer to deal creatively with human needs, "he must first make a radical, conscious break with all values he identifies as antihuman." Designers also must constantly be aware of the consequences of their actions on people and society. In fact, he declared that "total design is nothing more or less than a process of relating everything to everything." So he said that rather than specializing, designers must cultivate a broad base of knowledge and understanding.

Awards/Recognition
Prix de Rome for architecture, 1932
Best Office of the Year, New York Times, 1953
Gold Medal, Art Directors Club of New York, 1953
Good Design Award, Museum of Modern Art, 1954
Trailblazer Award, National Home Furnishings League, 1954
Chairman, International Design Conference in Aspen, 1965, 1982
Scholar in Residence, Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Design, 1984
Lifetime Achievement Award, American Institute of Graphic Arts, 1991
Permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, Brooklyn Museum of Art, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Nelson did so as few are able, and, with the help of well-timed zaps, he helped define modern, humane design.

Bertjan Pot

Bertjan Pot

Bertjan Pot was born 1975 in Nieuwleusen, the Netherlands (a small town in the east of the country). He now lives in Rotterdam working on various projects. Sometimes he initiates a project himself because he likes it so much that he feels that it just has to be made. Sometimes he is commissioned to do a project because other people like his work. Bertjan's main fascination is material and production processes.

In design, Bertjan flirts with computer esthetics and industrial production methods, but without using a computer (at least not as a design tool) and sometimes also without the industrial production method. Almost all designs come from experiments in materials, old and new. The way a product feels is just as important as the way it looks.



Ron Rezek

Ron Rezek

Ron Rezek designed the world's first contemporary-styled ceiling fan, the Stratos, in 1986. But his list of accomplishments in the design world is long and varied, from lifeguard equipment to contemporary lighting.

In 1997, Ron started The Modern Fan Co. in Ashland, Oregon, which produces and sells only contemporary ceiling fans.

His ceiling fans have been widely used in hotels, restaurants, retail and institutional applications, and all types of residential projects.

Ron Rezek's Philosophy:
"I don't think contemporary means a stark white room. I think it means a tasteful alignment of important elements. There are some designers who copy the Modernists who have come before. But I think 'contemporary' is the pursuit of the new."

"People assume that all contemporary fixtures are more functional than traditional ones. That is because contemporary fixtures are easier to clean and they seem to be more utilitarian based on their appearance. And because of their simplicity and lack of ornamentation, they also have an alliance with the industrial look. But all of this doesn't necessarily translate into function. The Modern Fan Co.'s fans are designed to be functional and energy efficient. This is part of being contemporary and pushing the edge. Energy efficiency is the wave of the future

Paolo Rizzatto

Paolo Rizzatto

Paolo Rizzatto was born in 1941 in Milan. He took his degree in Architecture in I965 at the Milan Polytechnic. He works as a freelancer in the field of architecture, design and interior design and continues to develop his experience as interior lighting designer. In 1978, Paolo Rizzatto founded Luceplan together with Riccardo Sarfatti. He has designed for Arteluce, Artemide, Luceplan, Alias, Cassina, Nemo, Molteni, Knoll, Kartell, Philips, Montina, Thonet and Guzzini.

Marcel Wanders

Marcel Wanders

Marcel Wanders grew up in Boxtel, the Netherlands, and graduated cum laude from the School of the Arts Arnhem in 1988. Marcel Wanders' fame started with his iconic Knotted Chair, which he produced for Droog Design in 1996. He is now ubiquitous, designing for the biggest European contemporary design manufacturers like B&B Italia, Bisazza, Poliform, Moroso, Flos, Boffi, Cappellini, Droog Design and Moooi of which he is also art director and co-owner. Founded in 2000, Moooi has grown into an internationally renowned design label. Additionally, Marcel Wanders works on architectural and interior design projects and recently turned his hand to consumer home appliances.

Marcel was the editor of the International Design Yearbook 2005. In the same year, together with chef Peter Lute, he established the extraordinary LUTE SUITES hospitality-concept, the first "all over city suites" hotel in the world. He also designed the interior of Blits, a new restaurant in Rotterdam and the interior of restaurant "Thor" at the Hotel on Rivington in New York including bar, lounge and private club. Marcel is the first and among the most important designers of Droog design. He was a juror for various prizes like the Rotterdam Design Prize (for which his own products were nominated several times) and the Kho Liang Ie prize. He lectured at SFMoMA, Limn, the Design Academy, Nike, IDFA, FutureDesignDays and has taught at various design academies in the Netherlands and abroad.

Various designs of Marcel Wanders have been selected for the most important design collections and exhibitions in the world, like the Museum of Modern Art in New York and San Francisco, the V&A Museum in London, the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, Museum Boijmans van Beuningen in Rotterdam, the Central Museum in Utrecht, Museum of Decorative Arts Copenhagen and various Droog Design exhibitions. Coverage on Marcel has been published in all leading design magazines and newspapers such as Domus, Interni, Blueprint, Design Report, Frame, I.D. magazine, Abitare, Wallpaper, Nylon, Elle decoration, Icon, Esquire, the International Herald Tribune, Washington Post, the Financial Times, the New York Times and Business Week.

Jaime Hayon

Jaime Hayon

Spanish artist-designer Jaime Hayón was born in Madrid in 1974. As a teenager, he submerged himself in skateboard culture and graffiti art, the foundation of the detailed, bold-yet-whimsical imagery so imminent in his work today. After studying industrial design in Madrid and Paris he joined Fabrica in 1997, the Benetton-funded design and communication academy, working closely with the legendary image-maker and agitator Oliverio Toscani. In a short time he was promoted from student to head of their Design Department, where he oversaw projects ranging from shop, restaurant and exhibition conception and design to graphics. Eight years later, Jaime broke out on his own, first with collections of designer toys, ceramics and furniture, followed by interior design and installation. His singular vision was first fully exposed in 'Mediterranean Digital Baroque' at London's David Gill Gallery, an exciting mise en sc鑞e, largely executed in ceramic, followed by 'Mon Cirque', which traveled to Frankfurt, Barcelona, Paris and Kuala Lumpur. These collections put Jaime at the forefront a new wave of creators that blurred the lines between art, decoration and design and a renaissance in finely-crafted, intricate objects within the context of contemporary design culture.

Jaime further defined his vision in subsequent solo exhibitions and shows at London's Aram Gallery, and Milan's Salone de Mobile and his work has been displayed in Germany's Vitra Museum, London's Design Museum, Rotterdam's Vivid Gallery, the Gronginger Museum (also in Holland) and the Basel Art Fair and has attracted the attention of prestigious art collectors. Jaime's esteem and knowledge of artisan skills and his inherent creativity has allowed him to push the boundaries of many mediums and functions.

Jaime currently resides in London, with offices in Barcelona and Treviso (Italy). His work has appeared in the most prestigious art and design publications worldwide. He has won numerous awards including 'Best Installation' (Icon Magazine), 'Breakthrough Creator' (Wallpaper Magazine) and the 2006 Elle Deco International Award. In 2008, Jaime was guest of honor at Belgium's Interieur Biennial, the youngest person ever to receive the accolade.

Patricia Urquiola

Patricia Urquiola


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